Archives for posts with tag: Amish

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In my last blog post, I wrote about making a quick trip to Pennsylvania to see my Amish friend Ruth (fictional name to protect her privacy). I first met Ruth when I was researching A Gift of Grace, the first in my Kauffman Amish Bakery Series.

Ruth lives on a dairy farm in Lancaster County and has seven children. She periodically hosts dinners for Englishers (non-Amish) as a way to make extra income. It gives Englishers an opportunity to experience an Amish home and meal. She invited me to attend a meal while I visited.

During the meal, Ruth served fruit salad, barbecue meatloaf, green beans from her garden, and homemade chicken and noodles. The meal was serve family style. For dessert, we served coffee, chocolate, and coffee flavored pudding. The food was delicious!

I asked her to send me her recipe for the meatloaf, and I thought I would share it in this blog post.

Ruth’s Barbecued Meatloaf

 

1 ½ lb. ground beef

Mix the following ingredients well and then add to ground beef and mix thoroughly:

  • 1 small onion, chopped
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 cup oatmeal
  • 1 egg
  • 1 ½ tsp. seasoned salt
  • 1 ½ tsp. chili powder
  • ¾ tsp. pepper

Topping:

  • 1 cup ketchup
  • ½ cup brown sugar
  • 1 ½ tsp. dry mustard
  • 1 ½ tsp. vinegar

Mix toping ingredients and spread over meatloaf. Bake 1 hour at 350 degrees

Enjoy!

 

Amy Clipston
Amy Clipston has been writing for as long as she can remember. She has a degree in communications from Virginia Wesleyan College and is a member of the Authors Guild, American Christian Fiction Writers, and Romance Writers of America. She is the author of the bestselling Kauffman Amish Bakery series and the Hearts of the Lancaster Grand Hotel series with Zondervan, which is part of HarperCollins Christian Publishing. Amy works full-time for the City of Charlotte, NC. She lives with her husband, two sons, mother, and four spoiled rotten cats.Readers can find Amy at AmyClipston.com, as well as on Facebook at:https://www.facebook.com/AmyClipstonBooks and on Twitter: @AmyClipston.

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Bakery

 

Recently I was able to make a quick trip to Pennsylvania to see my Amish friend Ruth (fictional name to protect her privacy). I first met Ruth when I was researching A Gift of Grace, the first in my Kauffman Amish Bakery Series.

Ruth lives on a dairy farm and has seven children. Our first encounter consisted with sitting in her kitchen for two hours and talking, and I found that she was soft-spoken, warm, and patient person I’d ever met. She never lost her patience with her children. And, since she has seven children, I was impressed. I have two boys, and I find myself constantly raising my voice. I knew when I met Ruth that I could learn to be a better person by following her example.

My friendship with Ruth has grown tremendously during the past five years. We’ve moved from occasional phone calls and visits to more regular calls. She and one of her daughters read my manuscripts and help me with the details and accuracy of my books.

During my most recent visit, Ruth invited me to come to a dinner that she was hosting in her home. Some Amish women host dinners for Englishers (non-Amish) as a way to make extra income. It gives Englishers an opportunity to experience an Amish home and meal. While I had visited Ruth many times, I had never had the opportunity to attend a meal like this.

There are approximately two dozen visitors who attended the meal. Ruth had a small table and also one long table set up in her kitchen. She invited the guests to come into the kitchen, and she asked me to sit at the head of the long table. Before the meal began, she said a prayer, thanking God for the beautiful day and the opportunity to host her new friends in her home.

She then began to serve the meal. Normally, Ruth hires two fifteen-year-old girls to help her since her daughters are busy working and her sons help with the farm. This evening her helpers were busy, so I did what I could assist her with her meal, which included fruit salad, barbecue meatloaf, green beans from her garden, and homemade chicken and noodles. The meal was serve family style. For dessert, we served coffee, chocolate, and coffee flavored pudding. The food was delicious!

After we ate, Ruth sat on a stool and asked the group where they were from. There were visitors from as close by as New Jersey and as far away as Europe. Ruth answered questions about the Amish culture, and she and her youngest daughter sang a beautiful song for us. She then led us in a verse of Amazing Grace.

I stayed after the guests had left and helped her wash dishes and clean up the kitchen. We talked about our families while we worked.

It was a blessing and an honor to experience a meal in Ruth’s home. I look forward to visiting Ruth again soon.

If you are able to visit Amish Country, I highly recommend that you have a meal in an Amish home. I’m certain you’ll have a wonderful time!

Blessings,

Amy Clipston

 

Amy Clipston
Amy Clipston has been writing for as long as she can remember. She has a degree in communications from Virginia Wesleyan College and is a member of the Authors Guild, American Christian Fiction Writers, and Romance Writers of America. She is the author of the bestselling Kauffman Amish Bakery series and the Hearts of the Lancaster Grand Hotel series with Zondervan, which is part of HarperCollins Christian Publishing. Amy works full-time for the City of Charlotte, NC. She lives with her husband, two sons, mother, and four spoiled rotten cats. Readers can find Amy at AmyClipston.com, as well as on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/AmyClipstonBooks and on Twitter: @AmyClipston.

Last Saturday I had the pleasure of speaking at the University City Regional Library. Not only was I able to meet a special reader, but I also enjoyed talking with an aspiring author. I enjoy speaking events because I am able to share the story of my husband’s kidney transplants and also my journey as a kidney donor.

On Monday, July 28, I am speaking at Rocky River Presbyterian Church, located at 7940 Rocky River Rd, Concord, NC 28025, at 7 p.m.  If you’re in the area, please stop by. I hope to see you there.

Below are photos from my event at the University City Library. I hope to see you at an event soon!

 

Amy Clipston

 Here I am posing during the presentation.

 

 

Amy Clipston2

Above I’m signing books after the presentation.

 

Amy Clipston3

My mom always comes to the events with me. I enjoy spending time with her and also taking her to lunch after the book signing.

 

Blessings,

Amy

 

Amy Clipston
Amy Clipston has been writing for as long as she can remember. She has a degree in communications from Virginia Wesleyan College and is a member of the Authors Guild, American Christian Fiction Writers, and Romance Writers of America. She is the author of the bestselling Kauffman Amish Bakery series and the Hearts of the Lancaster Grand Hotel series with Zondervan, which is part of HarperCollins Christian Publishing. Amy works full-time for the City of Charlotte, NC. She lives with her husband, two sons, mother, and four spoiled rotten cats. Readers can find Amy at AmyClipston.com, as well as on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/AmyClipstonBooks and on Twitter: @AmyClipston.

 

 

It’s finally warming up in Charlotte, NC, and I’m relishing the first days of spring. It’s such a beautiful time of year as we enjoy hearing the birds sing again, and the earth is renewed. I always look forward to seeing the daffodils sprout up in our yard. Daffodils are special to me since they remind me of the huge backyard behind the house where I grew up in New Jersey. My father once told me that the squirrels moved the daffodil bulbs, explaining why the flowers would poke up in random locations throughout the yard.

This year spring is even more special because the next book in my Hearts of Lancaster Grand Hotel series is set to release June 3. A Mother’s Secret is my favorite book in the series. Carolyn Lapp, the heroine of the book, is different from the other Amish women I’ve featured in my previous books. Due to her painful past, she’s more outspoken and less traditional than any other Amish character I have created. I also enjoyed giving Joshua Glick his own story since he had his heart broken in A Hopeful Heart.

 

MothersSecret3

 

Readers can pre-order the e-book version of A Mother’s Secret for $4.99 until June 2. Just follow this link to pre-order the book. Below is more information about the book.

Book Description

In A Mother’s Secret Carolyn Lapp dreams of marrying for love. But will the errors of her past destroy this dream forever? Carolyn Lapp longs to have a traditional Amish family. But she lives on her brother’s farm with her parents and her 15-year old son, Benjamin. Carolyn has never revealed the identity of Benjamin’s father and lives daily with the guilt and shame of her youthful indiscretion. Her brother simply will not forgive her. His answer is to arrange a practical marriage for Carolyn to Saul, a widower with a little girl. But Carolyn isn’t convinced that Saul really loves her and believes he is simply looking for someone to help raise his daughter. When Benjamin causes trouble at a local horse auction, horse breeder Joshua Glick decides that he must be taught a lesson. Carolyn and Joshua are unmistakably drawn to each other, but Joshua mistakenly assumes that Benjamin is Carolyn’s brother. Carolyn fears that if he discovers the truth, her past will destroy their budding romance. After years of shame and loneliness, Carolyn suddenly has two men vying for her attention. But which of them will give her the family—and the unconditional love—she’s longed for?

The Making of A Mother’s Secret

A Mother’s Secret was inspired while I was writing A Hopeful Heart. I felt Joshua Glick needed his own story. This book is dedicated to my amazing editor and dear friend, Becky Philpott.

I plan to give away advance copies of A Mother’s Secret beginning in May. You can check my Facebook page for contests.

I hope readers enjoy A Mother’s Secret. Book three in the series, A Dream of Home, will follow in December.

 

amishgarden

Last May I was able to ride in an Amish buggy. One thing I really appreciated was that the slow pace gives you time to enjoy the scene and to look around. I especially enjoyed looking at the Amish gardens.

The Amish take pride in their gardens. They put a lot of work into them because the garden provides a large amount of food for their family throughout the year.

And, yes, I did use the word “pride” at the beginning of the last paragraph. Even though they are humble people, the Amish want their gardens to look nice … because they know their neighbors will be driving by at a slow pace! (Or at least that’s what a friend finally confessed!)Screen Shot 2014-03-10 at 4.25.53 PM

I’m not a gardener myself, so I got help when working on my novella for An Amish Garden. My novella, Seeds of Faith, is about Heirloom Tomatoes. (Well, there is a romance in there, too, but the stars are the tomatoes!)

I know NOTHING about growing heirloom tomatoes, but thankfully my friend Melissa K. Norris does! She writes all about the Homesteading Lifestyle and … heirloom gardening.

If you’re not familiar with the term (I wasn’t!), heirloom gardening means saving this year’s seeds and using them in next year’s garden.

Most seeds used for consumer produce today are made in a lab and are sterile. This means you can’t save the seeds from the produce that you buy in the supermarket and plant them and expect the same results. Only heirloom seeds can be replanted with the same results. And my friend Melissa still uses seeds that have been passed down through her family for over 100 years! How amazing is that?

How about you? Are you a gardener? Or would like to be a gardener?

—Tricia Goyer

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For as long as I could remember, I collected memories. I have my second-grade report card, my junior high basketball schedule, my megaphone necklace from the cheerleading years, and the monogrammed napkin from my wedding. I collect small trinkets in shoeboxes, dresser drawers, and memory jars. In the 1970s and 1980s of my childhood, photographs meant having money for film and developing. Photos were only for special occasions, but trinkets could be slipped into one’s pocket and saved.

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I wrote about collecting memories in my new novel, The Memory Jar, but I also realized that in addition to collecting trinkets I’ve also collected stories, prayers, and Scriptures. I’ve been journaling for twenty years. I have thoughts tucked inside spiral-bound notebooks, leather journals, and everything in between. I keep these journals in a few boxes under my bed, and I enjoy pulling them out. Many prayer requests fill their pages. I smile as I can see time and time again how God answered those prayers. Sometimes God didn’t answer like I expected, but He always had a plan—a perfect plan. Better than I could have ever figured out.

There are times I try to imagine what my children and grandchild will think when they’re reading through the pages. Inside are my questions, cries of my heart, and even confessions. There are also prayers of surrender and praises. The picture they’ll see within my words is that I was completely human with joys and struggles like anyone else. Mostly I hope they’ll see that no matter what, I turned to God. I depended on Him in all circumstances.

My journals remind me of the stones of remembrance displayed in Joshua 4:20-22,

It was there at Gilgal that Joshua piled up the twelve stones taken from the Jordan River.

Then Joshua said to the Israelites, “In the future your children will ask, ‘What do these stones mean?’ Then you can tell them, ‘This is where the Israelites crossed the Jordan on dry ground.’

Have you set up stones of remembrance in your walk with God? Think back to those transforming moments. Then find a journal to write down your remembrances of God’s goodness in your life. If you have any mementos, collect them in a jar. As you remember God’s work, you’ll be amazing by how much is already captured in your heart!

Amish Proverb: A happy memory never wears out.

More about The Memory Jar: Every year, 30–40 young Amish men descend on the cozy little town of West Kootenai, Montana, arriving in the spring to live there for six months and receive ‘resident’ status for the hunting season in the fall. They arrive as bachelors, but go home with brides! Sarah Shelter has lived in West Kootenai for the last ten years and wonders if she will ever fall in love. Since the tragic death of her best friend, she carries her memories in a jar along with the small items connected to them. For just as long, she’s also been carrying around her emotions instead of allowing them to penetrate deep into her heart. Now she’s met a kind and gentle man who may be able to break down the wall. But can Sarah risk her heart to finally achieve her dreams?

—Tricia Goyer

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amishconnect31

Often when we think about the Amish, we think about how they separate themselves from the world. The truth is the Amish also make time to connect. They attend church and activities together. They are also neighbors. They know how to have fun and share their lives.

Here are a few things that the Amish do together. They enjoy:

  • Playing baseball
  • Shopping
  • Quilting bees
  • Baking
  • Off-Sunday visiting
  • Visiting and coffee at homes of friends
  • Work days at the homes of family members
  • Cooking food for weddings together
  • Traveling to the beach or the mountains
  • Sister days
  • Brother days
  • Camping
  • Work picnics
  • Christmas gatherings
  • Weddings
  • Christmas dinners
  • Playing volleyball
  • Fishing

Here are ways you can make time for friends:

  1. Put it on the schedule. Last week John and I met friends for dinner. It took two weeks to find a date, but we did it . . . and we had a great time!
  2. Create a regular event. For years we had a weekly small group that met at our house. Unless there was ten feet of snow or a baby being born, we met. Even though we now live a few thousand miles from those friends, we still remain close because of the time we had together and the memories we share.
  3. Join a group. When I moved to my new town, one of the first things I did was join a Bible Study. I made friends and was able to fill the void left from my move. (And I also enjoyed learning more about God!)
  4. Plan a vacation or a mission trip. Want to go on a trip? Find a few friends to join you. Not only will you enjoy the event, you’ll also enjoy the planning.
  5. Have an open heart. When I pray and ask God who I need to be a friend to today, He always puts someone on my mind. The best way to make a friend is to be a friend.

How about you? What do you do to connect?

—Tricia Goyer

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